The New Johari Window #2: Models of Interpersonal Awareness

The New Johari Window #2: Models of Interpersonal Awareness

Protected Rather than Hidden Self

I also tinker a bit with Luft’s labeling and description of the third quadrant. We are never really “hidden” in Q3. We are “leaking” all over the place—nonverbal communication, what we do and don’t say. We make assumptions, and try to “hide” these assumptions; however, through our actions we tend to provoke thoughts and actions in other people that confirm these assumptions.

Johari Window - Figure 2These assumptions become “self-fulfilling prophecies.” We can’t talk about any of this with other people and are even unlikely to reflect on these dynamics in our own minds. We are left, as a result, with what Chris Argyris and Don Schön identify as “self-sealed assumptions”.  Given this leakage and these dynamics regarding self-fulfilling prophesies and self-sealed assumptions, I am inclined to call this quadrant the “protected self” rather than the “hidden self.”

Given these modifications, allow me to present a first version of the New Johari Window – this model being two-dimensional like Luft and Ingram’s original Window.

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About the Author

William Bergquist

William BergquistWilliam Bergquist, Ph.D. An international coach and consultant, professor in the fields of psychology, management and public administration, author of more than 45 books, and president of a graduate school of psychology. Dr. Bergquist consults on and writes about personal, group, organizational and societal transitions and transformations. His published work ranges from the personal transitions of men and women in their 50s and the struggles of men and women in recovering from strokes to the experiences of freedom among the men and women of Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union. In recent years, Bergquist has focused on the processes of organizational coaching. He is coauthor with Agnes Mura of coachbook, co-founder of the International Journal of Coaching in Organizations and co-founder of the International Consortium for Coaching in Organizations. His graduate school (The Professional School of Psychology: www.psychology.edu) offers Master and Doctoral degrees in both clinical and organizational psychology to mature, accomplished adults.

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