Theory  E²: Working with Entrepreneurs in Closely-Held Enterprises IX: Interplay Between Entrepreneurs and Maturity, Tasks, Problems and Environment

Theory E²: Working with Entrepreneurs in Closely-Held Enterprises IX: Interplay Between Entrepreneurs and Maturity, Tasks, Problems and Environment

William Bergquist

We live in a world that yields few easy answers. Each setting in which entrepreneurship is exhibited differs from every other setting, and the relationship established between entrepreneurial leadership styles and context is always unique. Nevertheless, we do know something about good and bad matches and about which characteristics of a work environment generally have the greatest bearing on the effectiveness of our four approaches to entrepreneurship.

We will specifically examine six characteristics:  (1) maturity level (of the individuals and groups with which entrepreneur is working), (2) convening task(s), (3) convening problems, (4) external environment, (5) organizational structures and operations, and (6) organizational culture. In this essay, we will briefly consider the first four of these characteristics and suggest ways in which each of the four entrepreneurship styles relates to each of these characteristics. We will turn to the fifth and sixth characteristics in the next essay in this series.

Maturity Level of the Group

This first characteristic concerns the work-related maturity level of subordinates and groups reporting to an entrepreneur.  Three indicators of a group’s level of maturity are often identified: (1) ability to set high but realistic goals, (2) knowledge of the task and (3) experience in working with one another.

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About the Author

William Bergquist

William BergquistWilliam Bergquist, Ph.D. An international coach and consultant, professor in the fields of psychology, management and public administration, author of more than 45 books, and president of a graduate school of psychology. Dr. Bergquist consults on and writes about personal, group, organizational and societal transitions and transformations. His published work ranges from the personal transitions of men and women in their 50s and the struggles of men and women in recovering from strokes to the experiences of freedom among the men and women of Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union. In recent years, Bergquist has focused on the processes of organizational coaching. He is coauthor with Agnes Mura of coachbook, co-founder of the International Journal of Coaching in Organizations and co-founder of the International Consortium for Coaching in Organizations. His graduate school (The Professional School of Psychology: www.psychology.edu) offers Master and Doctoral degrees in both clinical and organizational psychology to mature, accomplished adults.

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